Mitchell

Borough

Published in The History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1790-1820, ed. R. Thorne, 1986
Available from Boydell and Brewer

Background Information

Right of Election:

in inhabitants paying scot and lot

Number of voters:

42 in 1792 falling to 18 in 1815

Population:

(1801): 160

Elections

DateCandidate
21 June 1790CHRISTOPHER HAWKINS
 DAVID HOWELL
28 May 1796(SIR) STEPHEN LUSHINGTON I, Bt.
 (SIR) CHRISTOPHER HAWKINS, Bt.
25 Apr. 1799 JOHN SIMPSON vice Hawkins, vacated his seat
6 July 1802ROBERT DALLAS
 ROBERT SHARPE AINSLIE
11 Feb. 1805 CHARLES WILLIAM HENRY MONTAGU SCOTT, Earl of Dalkeith, vice Dallas, appointed to office
6 Nov. 1806(SIR) CHRISTOPHER HAWKINS, Bt.
 FREDERICK WILLIAM TRENCH
15 Jan. 1807 SIR ARTHUR WELLESLEY vice Hawkins, chose to sit for Grampound or Penryn
 HENRY CONYNGHAM MONTGOMERY vice Trench, vacated his seat
21 Apr. 1807 WELLESLEY re-elected after appointment to office
12 May 1807EDWARD LEVESON GOWER
 GEORGE GALWAY MILLS
24 July 1807 SIR JAMES HALL, Bt., vice Leveson Gower, vacated his seat
1 Feb. 1808 CHARLES TRELAWNY BRERETON vice Mills, vacated his seat
21 Feb. 1809 JOHN BRUCE vice Brereton, vacated his seat
14 Oct. 1812JOHN BRUCE
 GEORGE ROBERT HOBART
13 Feb. 1813 HON. EDWARD LAW vice Hobart, vacated his seat
2 Aug. 1814 CHARLES TRELAWNY BRERETON vice Bruce, vacated his seat
5 Dec. 1814 THOMAS HAMILTON, Lord Binning, vice Brereton, vacated his seat
7 June 1816 BINNING re-elected after appointment to office
23 June 1818SIR GEORGE THOMAS STAUNTON, Bt.
 WILLIAM LEAKE

Main Article

After the expensive contest between Viscount Falmouth and Sir Francis Basset for control of Mitchell in 1784, a compromise ensued by which each party returned one Member in 1790,1 Basset naming Howell again and Falmouth Christopher Hawkins. Before the election of 1796 Basset sold his property at Mitchell to Hawkins, who, though sitting in that Parliament on Falmouth’s interest, henceforward shared the parliamentary patronage with him.

A ‘phalanx’ of 21 voters tried to disturb this arrangement, but Falmouth and Basset stood by Hawkins, who was informed that ‘the intrigues of Lord E[liot] and Mr [Richard] B[arwell], who it is more than probable are privately supported by the Treasury, it being very certain that administration don’t wish to see your influence increase in the House of Commons’, were at the bottom of it. Eliot and Barwell soon found that their interference exacerbated Hawkins’s poaching activities at Grampound and Tregony and gave it up. The patrons proceeded to reduce the number of tenements no