HOWE, Geoffrey (1926-2015).

Constituency

Dates

Bebington
15 October 1964 - 31 March 1966
Reigate
18 June 1970 - 28 February 1974
East Surrey
28 February 1974 - 9 April 1992

Biography

Richard Edward Geoffrey Howe was born in Glamorgan, Wales, on 20 December 1926. He was educated at Winchester College and did National Service with the Royal Corps of Signals (1945-48) before going to Cambridge. He was a member and chairman of the Cambridge University Conservative Association and a founding member of the Bow Group. He married Elspeth Rosamund Morton Shand (Baroness Howe of Idlicote) in 1953.

Howe was called to the Bar in 1952 and was made a QC in 1965. He unsuccessfully contested Aberavon in 1955 and 1959, a safe Labour seat. He was elected at Bebington, but lost the seat at the following election. Elected for Reigate in 1970, he became Solicitor General, working on the Industrial Relations Act and European Communities Act in 1972. In that same year he became Minister for Trade and Consumer Affairs until the end of Heath’s government in 1974.

In 1974 he was elected for East Surrey and served as Social Services spokesman and Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer. When Margaret Thatcher became Prime Minister in 1979, Howe was named Chancellor of the Exchequer and occupied the post until 1983. His tenure was marked by policies to liberalise the economy and to reduce inflation. From 1983 he served as Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs until 1989 when he became Deputy Prime Minister, Leader of the House of Commons and Lord President of the Council. He was Thatcher’s longest-serving Cabinet minister but resigned in 1990 over the government’s policy towards Europe. Howe stood down from the House of Commons in 1992 and was made a life peer as Baron Howe of Aberavon.

Geofrey Howe died on 9 October, 2015.

Transcript of clip

“It was quite difficult but it was always manageable [to have both a legal and a political career]. In a large number of the county court personal injury cases I did for the unions one could predict the duration... On one occasion I was doing a criminal case in Shropshire assizes and was on a three line whip back in London. The case was on Monday and Tuesday, and I chartered a plane to come back for the Monday vote... [On another occasion] I'd been doing a case at Haverfordwest Assizes against Emlyn Hooson. And I was able to say to him at the end of the second day when the case ended, ‘can I give you a lift back to London?’ And we did fly back in my chartered plane. As we flew over the RAF base in Wiltshire, as our plane was going over, the radio to which we were listening in the plane gave the news of the verdict of the case we’d been in. I won.”

Summary of interview

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Track 1 [01:19:14] Talks about his early family life and parents’ background in Wales. Went to Welsh chapel.  Politically his grandfather and great uncle were Liberals. Talks about his Great uncle [00.55] Regrets at not learning to speak Welsh. Wife called him “a fiery Welshman” –but flames diminished by being a Wykhamist by education.  Born 1926, aware of long queues outside labour exchange in the 1920s  -Port Talbot was a working class town  [02.10] with steel works.   Grandfather was a founder member of a trades union.  Later, as a barrister, his best clients were in the Iron and Steeltrades Confederation. Development of personal political views [3.18] as protégé of friend (Robert Sheaf) at Winchester. Wrote “Charter of St Martha’s Vineyard”  influenced by GK Chesterton –mixed but individualistic [4.20] Going to Winchester public school after local schools. Interesting and diverse influences –headmaster Spencer Leeson became Bishop of  Peterborough –introduced him to Europe.  Eric James was responsible for Debating Society which he joined. Winchester deeply linked to European religion and politics [06.20].  He and Robert planned out future political careers aged 15 –planned to be Prime Minister.  Talks about an essay he wrote during military training. [08.40] Cyril Robinson another important influence at Winchester (mentions other names too). History lessons gave an important grounding in world to come. Describes cycling round Hampshire and visiting old churches. Found Roman coin near Andover. Links with Winchester continued. [12.05] 1945 Election –he was campaigning for Liberal Party before joining the army, he enlisted in 1944 and expressed preference for Royal Signals. Had served in Home Guard and OCTU (Officer Training Cadets) signals platoon –was keen on making his own radio sets. [12.55] He was a Liberal Unionist, canvassed for Liberals at Exeter –they also had good sandwiches. Became a Conservative on arriving at Cambridge (University) –still regarded himself as “Chestertonian”. [14.57] Army career in Signals –training and commission. Snowed in at Catterick then went to East Africa for 20 months as 2nd in command of 100 soldiers [16.00] His commander had enlisted from the dole.  Not tempted by career in army already had a scholarship to study Law to Cambridge. [18.00] Father and Great Uncle were Solicitors, no question that he would be a lawyer. Trinity Hall [18.55]. Active in the Cambridge Union. Politics dominated his life at Cambridge chairman of Conservative Association [19.45]  Peers at Cambridge –mentions Denzil Freath, Tony Lloyd, Douglas Hurd, Greville Janner, Percy Craddock , Jack Ashley [22.06] A lot of intermingling. [23.22] Took Bar Exams (with Patrick Jenkin, close colleague). Refers to  origins of Bow Group [24.20] to match the intellectual component of the Fabian Society.  First pamphlet was on “Coloured people in Britain” trying to influence colonial and commonwealth people (who were otherwise voting Labour) with Conservative ideas